Family members Heirloom, National Treasure: Uncommon Images Show Black Civil War Soldiers

  • A yellowish brown photograph of Sgt. Hiram White. Sgt. White is wearing a buttoned-up jacket and a kepi in the portrait. He is leaning to his right and his kepi is on the left side of his head. His name is inscribed below the photograph on the same page.
    Hide caption

    A yellowish brown photograph of Sgt. Hiram White. Sgt. White is wearing a buttoned-up jacket and a kepi in the portrait. He is leaning to his appropriate and his kepi is on the left side of his head. His name is inscribed beneath the photograph on the exact same web page.

    Earlier Subsequent

    Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Present of Aneita Gates, on behalf of her son, Kameron Gates, and all the Descendants of Captain William A. Prickitt
  • A yellowish brown photograph of Sgt. Isaiah White. He is wearing a buttoned-up jacket with epaulets on the shoulders and a kepi. A bugle insignia is on the front of his kepi. His shoulders are straight and he is directly facing the camera. His kepi is on the left side of his head. His name is inscribed below the photograph on the same page.
    Hide caption

    A yellowish brown photograph of Sgt. Isaiah White. He is wearing a buttoned-up jacket with epaulets on the shoulders and a kepi. A bugle insignia is on the front of his kepi. His shoulders are straight and he is straight facing the camera. His kepi is on the left side of his head. His name is inscribed under the photograph on the exact same web page.

    Earlier Subsequent

    Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Present of Aneita Gates, on behalf of her son, Kameron Gates, and all the Descendants of Captain William A. Prickitt
  • A black-and-white photograph of John Walls. He is wearing a buttoned-up jacket with epaulets on the shoulders and a kepi. His kepi is on the right side of his head. He has a shoulder strap on his left side. His name is inscribed below the photograph on the same page.
    Hide caption

    A black-and-white photograph of John Walls. He is wearing a buttoned-up jacket with epaulets on the shoulders and a kepi. His kepi is on the correct side of his head. He has a shoulder strap on his left side. His name is inscribed below the photograph on the very same web page.

    Previous Next

    Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Aneita Gates, on behalf of her son, Kameron Gates, and all the Descendants of Captain William A. Prickitt
  • A black-and-white photograph of James Tall. He is wearing a buttoned-up jacket with epaulets on the shoulders and a kepi. He is holding a rifle and his left hand is visible in the picture. He is leaning slightly to the right side of the picture.
    Hide caption

    A black-and-white photograph of James Tall. He is wearing a buttoned-up jacket with epaulets on the shoulders and a kepi. He is holding a rifle and his left hand is visible in the image. He is leaning slightly to the right side of the picture.

    Preceding Subsequent

    Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Present of Aneita Gates, on behalf of her son, Kameron Gates, and all the Descendants of Captain William A. Prickitt
  • A black-and-white photograph of George H. Mitchell. He is wearing a buttoned-up jacket with epaulets on the shoulders and a kepi. He is also wearing a shoulder strap on his left side. A rifle rests against his left shoulder. He is leaning slightly to the right side of the picture. His name is inscribed below the photograph on the same page.
    Hide caption

    A black-and-white photograph of George H. Mitchell. He is wearing a buttoned-up jacket with epaulets on the shoulders and a kepi. He is also wearing a shoulder strap on his left side. A rifle rests against his left shoulder. He is leaning slightly to the right side of the picture. His name is inscribed below the photograph on the same web page.

    Earlier Subsequent

    Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Aneita Gates, on behalf of her son, Kameron Gates, and all the Descendants of Captain William A. Prickitt
  • A black-and-white photograph of William H. Morris. He is wearing a buttoned-up jacket with epaulets on the shoulders and a kepi. His kepi has a leather chin strap resting on the brim and is on the right side of his head. His name is inscribed below the photograph on the same page.
    Hide caption

    A black-and-white photograph of William H. Morris. He is wearing a buttoned-up jacket with epaulets on the shoulders and a kepi. His kepi has a leather chin strap resting on the brim and is on the correct side of his head. His name is inscribed below the photograph on the exact same web page.

    Prior Next

    Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Aneita Gates, on behalf of her son, Kameron Gates, and all the Descendants of Captain William A. Prickitt

1 of six

View slideshow i

Every single of the pictures in Capt. William A. Prickitt’s album could match in a locket: headshots of 17 black soldiers who served beneath the Union Army officer in the course of the Civil War, most of their names handwritten on the mat surrounding the photos.

At just two inches tall, the square, leather-bound album itself could be simply misplaced amongst the much more than 35,000 artifacts it will join at the Smithsonian’s new National Museum of African American History and Culture when it opens this week in Washington, D.C.

Its size belies its historical significance: It really is a uncommon instance of original photographs of African-American soldiers whose identity is documented.

“That is quite rare,” says Michele Gates Moresi, a curator at the museum. “And to have a group from the very same regiment with that information. There are photos of African-American soldiers with their troops that are accessible. Some of them are panoramic. We have a couple in our collection, but you don’t always know who’s who.”

The pocket-sized photo album of Capt. William A. Prickitt includes 4 albumen prints and 14 tintypes of 17 African-American Union soldiers from the 25th Regiment, United States Colored Troops (USCT), Company G. Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of Aneita Gates, on behalf of her son, Kameron Gates, and all the Descendants of Captain William A. Prickitt hide caption

toggle caption Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Present of Aneita Gates, on behalf of her son, Kameron Gates, and all the Descendants of Captain William A. Prickitt

The photo album stayed in the Prickitt loved ones for generations — it was passed down to the youngest child in the loved ones. Prickitt’s great-grandaughter Aneita Atwood Gates says she heard the stories about the captain — that he was born in 1839 in New Jersey and was a teacher just before he joined the army and ultimately came to serve as a captain in the Union Army’s newly formed U.S. Colored Troops.

By most estimates, about 200,000 black soldiers served in the Union Army. All of the commanders of the U.S. Colored Troops, or USCT, have been white.

Gates hardly ever saw the album while increasing up, but it ultimately was passed down to her. When she started taking care of it, she kept it tucked away in a box on a laundry space shelf.

Gates says she and other loved ones members were stunned when a military magazine published a story about it and they discovered the significance of their miniature family members heirloom.

“We just assumed that there have been other of these albums out there. Up to then, it was just this great little treasure we had,” she recalls. “But then it was like, oh my gosh, I’ve got a responsibility, a key duty.”

Gates says there was great cause why her great-grandfather wanted the pictures of the black soldiers in his firm. In 1864, Prickitt and his troops were sent to defend two forts in Florida. There, he became really ill with dysentery — the camps were unsanitary — and some of the soldiers took care of him.

“The guys saved my fantastic-grandfather’s life,” Gates says.

Gates says she and other descendants are content that the soldiers saved her great-grandfather — who was in his 20s, unmarried and childless at the time. But that they do not know a lot beyond that.

“It is like the biblical stories,” the 72-year-old Gates says. “They don’t have time to go via all of the specifics, they just give you the essence.”

Aneita Atwood Gates looks through an album of her great-grandmother’s side of the household, which includes a image of her excellent-grandfather William A. Prickitt, noticed right here. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Cheryl Corley/NPR

Gates, who lives in Petersburg, Ill., says her loved ones was torn at initial about donating the Prickitt album to the Smithsonian. They feared it would be lost in a museum so huge, and another museum closer to property wanted it, too. And the family members lastly realized it was valuable to the captain, who carried it in his pocket.

“I know all the men had to think a lot about him, and he of them, or he wouldn’t have had this tiny album of them, with all their pictures, and he would not have meticulously written their names in it, and that is what makes it so particular,” Gates says.

There are 18 pictures in the album, both paper prints and tintypes, of the 17 soldiers who served in Organization G. A single of the soldiers is pictured twice: He carries a gun in one photo, but not in the other. All are in uniform. Some put on hats with the insignia of a bugle — the designation for infantry. The names and ranks of all but one particular soldier accompany the pictures, written presumably by Prickitt.

A friend of the Gates family initial contacted the Smithsonian. Shayne Davidson is an artist and amateur genealogist who has drawn portraits of the soldiers and written a book about them.

Initial, she started researching the Gates family members tree and then dug up details about the black soldiers employing military records and census info. The youngest was about 15 the oldest was almost 50, Davidson discovered.

Some of the guys have been born totally free some have been slaves. Two of the males have been enlisted by their slaveholder. Slaveholders could be paid as much as $ 300 for enlisting men, and the slaves won their freedom, if they survived.

Not only did Davidson find out about the background of the soldiers, she in fact identified some of their descendants, like Vanessa Tall Bryant of Nashville, Tenn.

A photo of James Tall is amongst the images in the Civil War album. He is Bryant’s grandfather — not wonderful-grandfather.

Bryant, who is in her early 50s, says Tall lived a extended life, married three times and had 16 youngsters, fathering some, like her dad, at an elderly age. James Tall was 77 when her father, Sigel, was born in 1922.

When he enlisted during the Civil War, James Tall was really young, Bryant says.

“He was a slave near Murfreesboro, Tenn., and as a teenager he was sent by his slave owner to truly shoe a horse at a neighboring farm,” she says. “Even though he was there, the person that was shoeing the horse talked to him about the Union troops that had been around the area and told him he might want to take that chance to ride out.”

He took the chance and joined the Union Army.

Portraits of George W. Davis (left) and Sgt. Stephen Johnson. Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Present of Aneita Gates, on behalf of her son, Kameron Gates, and all the Descendants of Captain William A. Prickitt hide caption

toggle caption Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Present of Aneita Gates, on behalf of her son, Kameron Gates, and all the Descendants of Captain William A. Prickitt

Bryant first heard of Prickitt when her family’s search of military and pension records listed him as one particular of her grandfather’s commanding officers. She discovered out about her grandfather’s photo in the Prickitt album a year following her father — James Tall’s youngest kid — died at age 91.

“I believe he recalled a photo getting on the fireplace on the mantel in his house, a small tintype. When he was a kid, that property burned so that image did not survive,” Bryant says. “So it was a very emotional moment thinking that, wow, you wish your dad could have been here to see it.”

Bryant says she plans to travel to Washington to see the album. Aneita Gates, Prickitt’s excellent-granddaughter, says now everyone will be in a position to see the members of the 25th regiment of the USCT.

“Offers me goose bumps,” Gates says, “to share this small story of an officer and his males.”

Gates says that is what her family members wanted: a national stage for her fantastic-grandfather’s miniature album of black Civil War soldiers.

Arts &amp Life : NPR


From Ingenue To Antigone: Juliette Binoche Discusses Acting, Aging And Family members

18:11

Download

The Oscar-winning actress plays Antigone in a new translation of Sophocles’ 2,000-year-old tragedy. “It is a really potent play,” Binoche says. Sophocles “nonetheless is bringing so significantly truth in our lives.”

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. Our guest, the French actress Juliette Binoche, won an Oscar for her performance in the 1996 film “The English Patient.” She’s also recognized in America for her roles in the films “Chocolat,” “The Unbearable Lightness Of Being” and “Clouds Of Sils Maria.” She’s now on stage at the Brooklyn Academy of Music in the title part of the Greek tragedy “Antigone.” This production of the Sophocles play, with a new translation, was initial performed in Luxembourg, London and Edinburgh earlier this year and will tour in October with performances in Chapel Hill, Ann Arbor and the Kennedy Center. We’re going to hear the interview Binoche recorded for our show with FRESH AIR contributor Anna Sale, who hosts the podcast Death, Sex &amp Money. In “Antigone,” Binoche plays the daughter of Oedipus. Her brother fought and died in a civil war. He’s deemed a traitor by her uncle, King Creon, the ruler of Thebes. Creon has decreed that the brother should not be afforded the dignity of a burial. Antigone defies the order, buries her brother and is sentenced to death. She says she’s responding to a larger demand than the ruling of an authoritarian king. This clip is from a BBC film made of the production.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, “ANTIGONE”)

JULIETTE BINOCHE: (As Antigone) What they get in touch with law did not commence these days or yesterday. When they say law, they do not imply a statute of these days or yesterday. They mean the unwritten, unfaltering, unshakable ordinances of the gods that no human becoming can ever wrap around. These laws reside forever. No one particular knows how they were born. You believed I would transgress them for fear of some mere mortal man’s decree. No.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

ANNA SALE, BYLINE: Juliette Binoche, welcome to FRESH AIR.

BINOCHE: Thank you extremely much for getting me.

SALE: What about this play in distinct, this tragedy, have been you drawn to?

BINOCHE: Sophocles is still – 2,500 years following, he’s nevertheless bringing so much truth in our lives. I am fascinated by it and how can a play – can survive that quantity of time, ’cause it does bring the concerns about the politics, the gods, the belief. It really is a extremely potent play.

SALE: One particular of the concerns is what is the suitable remedy of terrorists – men and women who had been deemed terrorists by the state? And just months just before the play opened in London, there were, of course, the shootings in Paris, the Charlie Hebdo shootings. I wonder how did that – did that affect your interpretation of the play and how you saw your character?

BINOCHE: It did bring some inquiries to me due to the fact I was reading in the newspaper that the criminals who did that – nobody wanted to bury them. The area, you know, exactly where they had been born or were raised did not want to bury them. Everyone was trying to steer clear of it, and a Muslim neighborhood, finally, in the middle of the night, buried them, hidden from the other folks. And it truly brought the question to me, you know, simply because Antigone, my character in the play, is burying her brother, who’s a criminal, as well. And no one wants to bury him. But Antigone, his sister, wants to bury him. And so I believed, OK, this is the case of the jihadists, you know, who – no one wants to bury them, and yet they are becoming buried. I know me, Juliette, I would bury anybody. If you happen to be a human being, no matter what you have accomplished, you have to bury your people. That is the law that is beyond, for me, queries. It’s part of what we do. We have to bury our men and women. It says in “Oedipus At Colonus” that if you do not bury somebody, their soul will wander about for the – till the eternity – the end of the eternity, which is in no way. And so, for me, most likely ’cause I am a mother and there is something about providing birth, you give the body the possibility to live. You have to take care of it till the finish. It’s – there is no query to me. The moral judgment, you know, the very good and bad is somehow on yet another level.

SALE: A single of your very first starring roles, in 1985’s “Rendez-vous,” was co-written by Olivier Assayas. And, practically 30 years later, he wrote and directed you in the film, the “Clouds Of Sils Maria,” which came out last year. In the role he wrote for you, you play a lauded and prolific actor, a lot like yourself, who is returning to a play that created the character well-known. The twist in the film is that when you had been young, you played the young ingenue, a character named Sigrid. Now you happen to be playing an older, somewhat bitter woman named Helena who falls in enjoy with Sigrid. Let’s listen to a clip, and to set it up, you have been giving notes to the young actress who’s now playing opposite you – the actress is named Jo-Ann, played by Chloe Grace Moretz – and you happen to be asking her about a pivotal scene where you’re playing the older character, Helena. And Jo-Snn, the younger actress, is playing Sigrid, the part you played years before.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, “CLOUDS OF SILS MARIA”)

BINOCHE: (As Maria Enders) I wanted to ask you. You know the scene at the starting of act three, when you inform me you want to leave and I get on my knees and I beg you to remain – you happen to be on the telephone ordering pepperoncini pizza for your coworkers in accounting. What – you leave without hunting at me, as if I did not exist. If you could pause for a second, you know, Helena’s distress would final longer when she’s left alone in her office. Properly, the way you’re playing it, the audience follows you out but instantly forgets about her, so…

CHLOE GRACE MORETZ: (As Jo-Ann Ellis) So – so what?

BINOCHE: (As Maria Enders) Properly, when I played Sigrid, I held it longer. I thought it was a lot more effective and dramatic. I imply, it actually played nicely.

MORETZ: (As Jo-Ann Ellis) Effectively, no one actually gives a [expletive] about Helena at that point, do they? I am sorry, but, I mean, it’s fairly clear to me this poor woman’s all washed up. I mean your character, correct, not you.

SALE: You 1st had your breakthrough roles as that young ingenue, and you are at a diverse point in your profession now. Have you felt the require to reinvent yourself, as your character in this film does?

BINOCHE: You know, ingenue does not imply something to me, you know, because this innocence that has – the flavor of innocence in the ingenue word is, for me – you can be ingenue at any age. Innocence has practically nothing to do with age. And I would even say that as you peeling off in your life, you turn out to be far more and more oneself. You take away all the education, all the fears. For me, it is – there are changes in life, you know, that undoubtedly – you can not hold on to things when you’re reaching at a particular age due to the fact when you happen to be holding on, it doesn’t operate. And this scene you just played is a pivotal scene for my character in the film simply because it’s the moment where she sees there’s no going back. And when she accepts that she can not possess anyone, she can’t alter anything, she cannot – she does not have the power as just before, somehow she gets onto one more level of consciousness and onto a level of freedom. And you gain your freedom to get to the core of oneself. That’s truly what I am experiencing.

SALE: The character that you play in the film, named Marie Enders, has several similarities with you in your career. You both broke out…

BINOCHE: Oh, you consider that.

SALE: Nicely…

BINOCHE: (Laughter) And the director tends to make you consider that. That is how excellent he is.

SALE: You can tell me the methods that you’re really distinct from Marie, but there are notable similarities. You each broke out as young actors on stage.

BINOCHE: That’s what occurs to actors, largely.

(LAUGHTER)

SALE: That is true. You both performed in “The Seagull,” both you and the character in the film.

BINOCHE: Yeah, that – I stated to him, you tricky, you know, simply because you take real details and put it in your – into your film. And he laughed simply because he knows it is correct.

GROSS: We’re listening to the interview FRESH AIR contributor Anna Sale recorded with FRESH AIR – with French actress Juliette Binoche. Following we take a brief break, we’ll speak about how Binoche was found by the French film director, Jean-Luc Godard. This is FRESH AIR.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GROSS: This is FRESH AIR. Let’s get back to the interview FRESH AIR contributor Anna Sale recorded with French actress Juliette Binoche, who is now starring in a production of “Antigone” at the Brooklyn Academy of Music.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED BROADCAST)

SALE: You were just turning 20 years old when a photo of you caught the eye of Jean-Luc Godard. And he approached you about a meeting.

BINOCHE: Yeah.

SALE: You starred in his 1985 film, “Hail Mary.” Do you know what he was responding to from that photograph of you? Do you have a sense?

BINOCHE: Effectively, to tell you the truth, it was my initial boyfriend. He was an Italian, superb person, really, really good and quite generous. He really took care of me when I had no place to reside, no income, no practically nothing, and I was, you know, being a cashier in a large division retailer and performing my theater classes in the evening simply because my parents couldn’t assist me financially. And I bear in mind – he was taking images at the time. He had a camera and I asked him to take pictures of me. And I would create the images myself in the bathroom, you know, building my films and undertaking – because it was much less high-priced. So one particular day, I asked him to do the photos (laughter), and he did not want to do it. And I was really pissed with him simply because I required these images. So finally he took those photos, but my expression was, like, pissed off at him.

(LAUGHTER)

BINOCHE: And my eyes had been really saying it. So I think that the intensity of my face in this image – it was the picture that Godard liked, you know?

SALE: What was it like to work with Godard at the extremely begin of your career?

BINOCHE: You know, when I feel back, I recognize him far more than at the time when I worked with him since, as a young actress, you know I was coming out of this school and the teacher – my teacher at the time was just so – taking time, being generous, you know, and mothering me. So when I went to Jean-Luc Godard’s film, I believed, he’s going to support me, of course, and it wasn’t that at all. He only had five individuals shooting, you know, the sound engineer, the DP, the – possibly a script. And I keep in mind he was very impatient. But when I look back, he always wanted – he always shot when he truly felt like shooting. So there was some type of sincere require that he was in touch with, with himself. And that I really appreciate now that I know it. At the time, I remember that I didn’t know which way to go ’cause one particular day he was providing me a monologue and stated I am going to put an ear plug in your ear and give you the text because it was a single day after the other and I did not have the memory to, you know, execute this monologue. And then I arrive on the set, you know, ready to go with this monologue and he mentioned, no, fine, you just say those two sentences. That is sufficient. You know, so I had to adapt with his emotions going up and down. So I was very insecure. I knew – couldn’t bear any makeup and – simply because I was obtaining red like crazy, at the time. You know, my emotions had been really close to my skin. So I remember becoming extremely ashamed of all the reds coming up my cheeks – things like that, you know, easy factors.

SALE: Both of your parents have been performers. Your mother was an actress, your father, an actor and director.

BINOCHE: So my father, really, was touring around the globe in a theater, you know, group he had.

SALE: Yeah.

BINOCHE: He was not sending funds so it was really insecure sometime. My mother – she was an actress. She was, you know, studying all – in all this. And then, at 30 years old, she stopped everything and went into studying literature – French literature. And she got her exams and she became a teacher. So that was very courageous of her. But then, at 50 years old, she stopped every thing and went back to acting and directing and writing, as nicely. So I had parents that have been quite sort of accessible to whatever they had been feeling they necessary to do somehow. They didn’t try to be too standard. In that way, that was a fantastic, you know, model as you go with what is inside. It does not appear secure from outside, but inside, you have to start off from inside. And that is truly what happened. So regardless of whether I was an actor or painter or dancer, it didn’t matter – or what ever I wanted to do, it didn’t matter. It’s just that you stick to what’s inside.

SALE: So you began studying theater and acting…

BINOCHE: Very young.

SALE: …As a teenager.

BINOCHE: Yeah.

SALE: And then you lived with your sister right after leaving college?

BINOCHE: At 15 years old I was nevertheless at college and had the idea whether or not I was going to go to a boarding college, you know, an hour from exactly where my mother was living or go to Paris with my sister and live there with my grandmother, truly, was functioning. We were living in a Presbyterian since she was the cook of the priest. And we had – we rented to all – know all the details, sorry about that – and we rented a small old studio there where I lived with my sister.

SALE: You and your sister – how old had been you?

BINOCHE: I was 15.

SALE: And how old was she?

BINOCHE: Eighteen.

SALE: How did your connection with your sister modify when you became popular?

BINOCHE: She went to China for a year during that period of time when I became a lot more properly-known actress in France. So when she came back from China, she was extremely shocked. And she truly changed her name because every single time she had to sign a verify she had to say how we have been connected and all that. And it was really a discomfort in the ass for her.

SALE: (Laughter).

BINOCHE: So, you know, I entirely understand. Almost certainly not simple for her to start off with. Now – I mean, we talked a lot about it. We’re very close.

SALE: I want to ask you about what occurred in your life in 1996 when “The English Patient” came out and was this crucial and commercial juggernaut, winning nine Oscars, such as yours for Greatest Supporting Actress. How did starring in that film alter your life?

BINOCHE: The shooting was – the – to start off with, actually, my hands were trembling. I was so frightened. I do not know why. I think it had to do with the challenge of it. There was one thing that I was playing this function scared me. I do not know precisely what it was but there was an inside feeling that produced me shake. And then the second month of shooting, I was entirely confident because I was in his arms, somehow, in Anthony Minghella’s arms, due to the fact Anthony Minghella was a force.

SALE: The director.

BINOCHE: He was – he has this capacity to assistance in being present and intelligent and adapting himself. And he had a vision of his film fairly clear and extremely supportive and loving. And so out of that, the whirlwind of the promotion and the quantity of interviews we did for the film around the world, traveling about, it was, like, new to me. But, you know, to tell you the truth, just ahead of the Oscar – three months prior to – I was fired from a film. And it was the most horrible knowledge I had because I’ve by no means been fired by anybody due to the fact I give myself so much – 200 %. I did not count on it. And I was genuinely at the bottom of the – how do you say – of the properly.

SALE: Yeah.

BINOCHE: That, you know, three months before – and so when I got the Oscar, it was like a large joke to me. I just could laugh inside so much because life is – it in no way ends, you know? It’s constantly surprising you.

SALE: Did it transform your life?

BINOCHE: It transforms my interviews.

(LAUGHTER)

SALE: That is funny. Juliette Binoche, thank you so considerably for joining us on FRESH AIR. Thank you extremely considerably.

GROSS: Juliette Binoche spoke with FRESH AIR contributor Anna Sale, who hosts the WNYC podcast, Death, Sex &amp Funds. Binoche is starring in a production of “Antigone” at the Brooklyn Academy of Music with performances through October four.

Copyright © 2015 NPR. All rights reserved. Visit our internet site terms of use and permissions pages at www.npr.org for additional data.

NPR transcripts are produced on a rush deadline by a contractor for NPR, and accuracy and availability could vary. This text could not be in its final form and might be updated or revised in the future. Please be conscious that the authoritative record of NPR’s programming is the audio.

Arts &amp Life : NPR