Adopted From Abroad? Tell Us Your Meals Stories

Family sitting around table eating dinner, a woman's arms in the foreground.

Robert Daly/Getty Pictures

At The Salt, we speak a lot about how food and cultures intersect and how we can understand about ourselves via what we eat — or don’t eat.

For numerous of us, food can serve as a way to discover our heritage. But what happens when you grow up in a household with a various ethnic, racial or cultural background than your own? How does food play into your sense of who you are?

If you are an international adoptee, and you’ve got a story about meals, residence and identity, we want to hear from you. Your story could end up on radio or NPR.org!

What you want to do:

1. Record a Voice Memo on your smartphone.
two. Start by telling us your name and exactly where you reside. (Instance: “Hi my name is ______, and I live in _____.” )
three. Inform us how old you are.
four. Inform us your story in two minutes or much less, answering these questions (anecdotes are great):

— Exactly where had been you adopted from?
— Exactly where had been you raised?
— How does meals play into your sense of who you are? (Or perhaps it does not, on goal.) Are there stories or anecdotes associated to specific dishes?

five. E-mail the Voice Memo file to thesalt@npr.org. Make confident the e-mail involves the right spelling of your name and how to reach you by telephone.

If you happen to be not certain how to record a Voice Memo, right here are great directions from our buddies at WNYC.

As well shy to record a voice memo? You can also join the conversation on Twitter @NPRFood.

Arts &amp Life : NPR


Meals Podcasts 1.: These Radio Pioneers Had It Down 90 Years Ago

Evelyn Birkby interviews guests on her KMA radio program, Down a Country Lane, in 1951 in Shenandoah, Iowa.

Evelyn Birkby interviews guests on her KMA radio system, Down a Nation Lane, in 1951 in Shenandoah, Iowa. Courtesy of University of Iowa Women’s Archives/Evelyn Birkby Collection hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of University of Iowa Women’s Archives/Evelyn Birkby Collection

Long ahead of the homemade vibes of meals podcasts, there were folksy radio homemakers. These early 20th-century women presented recipes, life hacks and insights for the contemporary farmer’s wife. And just like podcasts nowadays, their shows have been frequently individual, off-the-cuff and straight from the kitchen table.

“We have been just women who shared our lives,” says Evelyn Birkby. “We shared what we have been doing with our families, what we have been cooking, what we were eating.” Birkby began hosting Down a Nation Lane out of Shenandoah, Iowa, 65 years ago on KMA radio.

The station was the brainchild of Earl May possibly, owner of the May possibly Seed and Nursery Company. In 1925, the early days of radio, May possibly saw the new medium as way to build an audience for his items. He asked listeners to create in with their addresses for a free flower bulb — and rapidly expanded his catalogue mailing list. By continuing to develop new, woman-centered content each and every day, his nursery was ever present in the ears of individuals who produced the household buying choices.

KMA broadcasts, and other people like them, gave farm wives info they could use each day, whilst connecting listeners across the isolation of the Midwestern prairie. The familiar voices who hosted these shows became an intimate presence in fans’ properties — in component, since some ladies broadcast proper out of their properties. Birkby, who still broadcasts as soon as a month, collected the stories of some of these pioneering female broadcasters in her book Neighboring on the Air: Cooking With the KMA Radio Homemakers.

Florence Falk and a rooster are pictured in the 1950s at a table in the dining room where broadcasts of The Farmer's Wife originated.

Florence Falk and a rooster are pictured in the 1950s at a table in the dining area where broadcasts of The Farmer’s Wife originated. Courtesy of University of Iowa Women’s Archives/Evelyn Birkby Collection hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of University of Iowa Women’s Archives/Evelyn Birkby Collection

Florence Falk, who hosted The Farmer’s Wife, gave her audience a taste of farm life by narrating the scenes she spotted via her dining space window and sharing dishes inspired by her Swedish heritage. Adella Shoemaker drew listeners in for a “pay a visit to” to her sunroom, reveling in the freedom that the new medium of radio gave her. Birkby says that Shoemaker loved the notion that she could move from kitchen to microphone, appearing just before her fans even in an apron splattered with the day’s canning. And soon after a car accident place Leanna Driftmier in a wheelchair, she hosted her well-known Kitchen-Klatter from the mini-studio that KMA set up in her home. There, she dished up recipes for Midwestern staples like meatloaf and angel food cake.

“It was just like they have been sitting there with you,” says Birkby. They were, she jokes, some thing of an early assistance group — particularly for farm wives.

“For a lot of rural women, their nearest neighbor may well be a number of miles away,” explains Erika Janik,a scholar of women’s and Wisconsin history and executive producer of the Wisconsin Public Radio show Wisconsin Life. She says these actual-life radio shows helped listeners and hosts make “pals on the air.”

Wisconsin Public Radio, one of the oldest stations in the nation, first received its WHA call letters in 1922. And in 1929, the station began broadcasting The Homemakers Plan, which aired for 38 years. The hosts — from the university’s home economics department or extension services — created shows for a captive audience “who were residence carrying out the cooking and cleaning in the course of the day and listening to the radio,” explains Janik.

But the show had a bigger aim — “to elevate rural ladies by way of education on technologies and domestic science,” Janik says. The notion was to place farm wives in touch with the newest tactics and trends (feel convenience foods) that urban women currently enjoyed.

“They did roundtable discussions about recipes and meals,” says Janik. Or listeners could write in and ask for advice about a cooking failure, “and the home economists would attempt to tackle it.” A lot like America’s Test Kitchen today, she adds.

In 1933, when Aline Hazard started to host the plan, she occasionally took the private touch on the road, broadcasting from listeners’ personal kitchens and gardens. Hazard, who was necessary to upgrade her degree in English and speech with 1 in home economics in order to host the show, learned alongside her listeners. That gave her shows a sense that “you are on this journey collectively,” Janik says.

At a time when commercial stations permitted “10, 15, maybe 20 minutes” for meals applications, the early public radio shows ran an hour or two a day, explains Janik, providing listeners far more speak to time with the ladies whose lives they felt they shared. She says hosts like Hazard received thousands of letters from listeners who “regarded as her a good buddy.”

Birkby and a guest, Vicar Henry Robbins, a local pastor, 1950. &quotWe were just women who shared our lives,&quot Birkby says of herself and her fellow radio homemakers. &quotWe shared what we were doing with our families, what we were cooking, what we were eating.&quot

Birkby and a guest, Vicar Henry Robbins, a local pastor, 1950. “We had been just females who shared our lives,” Birkby says of herself and her fellow radio homemakers. “We shared what we have been performing with our families, what we had been cooking, what we have been consuming.” Courtesy of University of Iowa Women’s Archives/Evelyn Birkby Collection hide caption

itoggle caption Courtesy of University of Iowa Women’s Archives/Evelyn Birkby Collection

Examine this intimacy and neighborliness to programs like Aunt Sammy — a radio character created by the Department of Agriculture in the 1920s. In 1925, the USDA launched a radio plan to provide tips to farmers. The following year, “Aunt Sammy” was conceived as the female counterpart, who would speak to the concerns of the farmers’ wives. A single script was drafted in Washington, D.C., and sent to radio stations across the country, exactly where it would be read by a lady in the regional dialect. There was no space for deviation or personalization. It was a far cry from these hosts who “literally shared their lives,” says Birkby.

For some fans, listening in was like catching up with a excellent pal over the phone — sometimes literally. In the days of celebration lines, explains Birkby, 1 farm wife with a crystal set could ring fellow listeners on the exact same phone line. When the program began, “you would lift your receiver and ring the celebration line,” she says. As quickly as your buddies heard the bell, “everyone would lift up their receivers, and 13 or 14 individuals listened to the identical radio.”

Today, we’ve replaced the phone with earbuds. With their occasionally informal presentation and direct connection to the host, Janik says, “I see podcasts drawing a direct line back to these homemaking applications.”

Birkby says she and others designed an intimate environment “exactly where you could not wait until the subsequent day to listen once again.”

It was significantly less like a broadcast from far away, and much more like an afternoon break for a very good conversation about food and drink. Birkby recalls: “I would say to the listeners, ‘Pull up a chair, I’ll pour you a cup of coffee, and let’s check out.’ “


Anne Bramley is the author of Eat Feed Autumn Winter and the host of the Eat Feed podcast. Twitter: @annebramley

Arts &amp Life : NPR