Singer And Actor David Cassidy Says He Has Dementia

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Entertainer David Cassidy has revealed that he is now fighting dementia. He’s observed right here right after singing the national anthem at Boston’s Fenway Park in 2009. Mary Schwalm/AP hide caption

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Mary Schwalm/AP

Saying that he’s been diagnosed with the identical condition that struck his mother and grandfather, singer David Cassidy has revealed that he is fighting dementia. The star whose profession was launched by 1970s Television show The Partridge Loved ones had not too long ago told fans that he was on a farewell tour.

“I was in denial, but a element of me often knew this was coming,” Cassidy, 66, tells Folks magazine, in an interview about his situation.

The revelation comes following two current developments: Earlier this month, Cassidy stated that he would no longer tour soon after 2017 and more than the weekend, the website TMZ posted a video from his Saturday evening show, in which the star appears to struggle to recall lyrics and keep his balance.

Last week, as Cassidy discussed the last shows he had planned to play in California, he stated: “I just cannot tour anymore. I know it is time.”

On his Facebook page, Cassidy had recently stated he wanted to perform till the finish of the year, urging fans to come see the final concerts in what he stated were 49 years of touring.

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“I am not going to vanish or disappear forever,” Cassidy wrote.

But it now seems that his overall health concerns have forced Cassidy to hasten his retirement date. His mother, Evelyn Ward, died at age 89 after struggling with dementia for years, Cassidy has stated.

The former teen idol has been an active supporter of the Alzheimer’s Association, auctioning off some of his old costumes to benefit the group right after his mother’s death late in 2012. In current years, Cassidy has also been forced to auction a property and other items as part of bankruptcy and divorce proceedings.

The performer’s official web page also lately highlighted a 1972 interview he did with the BBC, in which Cassidy talked about his life as Keith Partridge — and how he attempted, without success, to elude masses of fans. At the finish of that chat, he was asked if he worried about how ephemeral his fame and achievement might be.

“I never be concerned about it at all,” Cassidy said. “I consider by the time that it does type of die out, I’ll be wanting it to.”

Arts &amp Life : NPR

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